Quick diagnosis and treatment.

Glaucoma is an eye disease that threatens your vision causing optic nerve damage. It is most often formed due to increased pressure in the eye, caused by poor drainage of the natural fluid (aqueous humor), which is necessary to supply nutrients to the cornea and lens. Glaucoma tends to be inherited an may not show up until later in life. Because most people don’t have early symptoms or pain from the high pressure, it is important to see your eye doctor regularly so that you can achieve quick diagnosis and receive the treatment you need.

Treatment Options:

Eye drops (First line of activity): Eye drop medications lower IOP by either reducing the amount of fluid entering the eye of increasing the amount of fluid exiting the eye. There are several different kinds of glaucoma medications, and each differs in terms of both its ability to lower IOP and its potential side effects. Laser therapy often is used when medications fail to lower IOP; it is also used for patients who cannot tolerate medications due to side effects.

Glaukos iStent: There is an exciting new technology for glaucoma patients that will be having cataract surgery. Learn more about the iStent implant, which lowers intraocular pressure and helps to manage mild to moderate open-angle glaucoma. Patients who have had the iStent placed may experience a reduction in the need for glaucoma medications.

  • iStent is the first MIGS device that improves your eye’s natural fluid outflow to safely lower eye pressure by creating a permant opening in the trabecular meshwork, and works continuously to improve the outflow of fluid from your eyes to help control eye pressure. Proven safe and effective, the iStent Trabecular Micro-Bypass is safely implanted during cataract surgery, spares important eye tissue often damaged by traditional surgeries and doesn’t limit treatment options that could help maintain your vision in the future. iStent is the smallest medical device every approved by the FDA.
  • iStent is the smallest medical device every approved by the FDA. It is placed in your eye during cataract surgery and is so small that you won’t be able to see or feel it after the procedure is over.
Glaucoma Doctors Bluffton SC

Risk Factors:

  • Intraocular Pressure (Fluid build-up)
  • Age
  • Inherited Background
  • Ethnic Background

Two Glaucoma Types:

  • Open-Angle Glaucoma: Also called primary or chronic glaucoma, accounting for at least 90% of all glaucoma cases, this type has symptoms and damage that aren’t noticed as they develop slowly and is a lifelong condition.
  • Closed-Angle Glaucoma: This less common type is also called acute or chronic angle-closure, or narrow-angle glaucoma, which can cause a sudden buildup of pressure in the eye. It’s symptoms occur suddenly and are much more severe and noticeable.

Laser Periperal Iridotomy (LPI) (For patients who have narrow angles or angle closure glaucoma): This glaucoma procedure is performed on patients with angle-closure glaucoma. As with many medical conditions, it is preferable to treat patients at risk and thereby avoid vision loss. In angle-closure glaucoma, the drainage system of the eye may be come partially or completely blocked by the iris (the colored part of the eye). A small hole is made in the iris to create a new way for the aqueous fluid to drain from the eye. The new drainage hole restores the balance between fluid entering and leaving your eye.

Argon Laser Trabeculoplasty (ALT) (For patients with primary open-angel glaucoma): For patients with primary open-angle glaucoma, ALT is directed at the iris (the colored portion of the eye) to help lower the eye pressure inside the eye. This laser treatment may be used as an alternative to adding glaucoma topical medications or in combination with glaucoma topical medications.

How We Evaluate Glaucoma:

  • Dilated fundus examinations
  • Monitor pressure
  • Assess risk factors
  • Advanced testing
    • Visual Fields
    • VEP
  • Nerve OCT’s

Visual Evoked Potential

Visual Evoked Potential (VEP) measures the electrical activity in the vision system. When light from an image enters your eye, it is converted into electrical energy at the retina and travels through the optic nerve to the visual cortex of the brain which processes vision. The Diopsys® VEP test measures the strength of the signal reaching your visual cortex and how fast it gets there.

The VEP technology in Diopsys® NOVA and ARGOS devices helps determine how your eyes communicate with your brain in a way that no other instrument or vision test can..

How the test is done:

First the technician will prepare your skin to be clean, dry, and free of any lotions or oils so the sensory pads can be placed on your head.

After positioning the sensory pads, the technician starts the test. He or she may ask that you cover one eye at a time to record each eye’s response independently. Once the test begins, you will see a series of black and white patterns that appear to “flip” quickly over and over again on a computer screen. It is simply a matter of looking at the pattern for the duration of the test. The computer will capture the information and produce a report for the doctor’s interpretation of the results.

Pattern Electroretinography (ERG)

Pattern ERG measures the function of your retina – the light-sensitive layer at the back of your eye. When light from an image enters the eye, it is converted into electrical energy by specialized cells in the retina. These cells send electrical impulses through the optic nerve to the brain where the image is processed. The Diopsys® ERG test records how well the cells of the retina are conveying electrical impulses within the eye.

ERG results have been demonstrated to aid in the diagnosis and treatment planning of many vision disorders.

How the test is done:

First the technician will prepare your skin to be clean, dry, and free of any lotions or oils so the sensory pads can be placed on your head and on your lower eyelids.

After positioning the sensory pads, the technician starts the test. He or she may ask that you cover one eye at a time to record each eye’s response independently. Once the test begins, you will see a series of black and white patterns that appear to “flip” quickly over and over again on a computer screen. It is simply a matter of looking at the pattern for the duration of the test. The computer will capture the information and produce a report for the doctor’s interpretation of the results.